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FAQs

General Questions

Do you paint everyday?

I would like to say yes but I am afraid I am not disciplined enough. Life gets in the way of living.

When did you know you were an artist?

I remember taking art classes from a friend’s mother. She put a painting of mine in her store window. I received an offer of a lot of money for it! ( A lot of money for a kid!!!!!!!) I could not part with it. The painting is long gone. Thrown out, I am sure.

I remember being in an art class in high school and feeling like this is where I belong. But my parent’s choices were the only choices open to me. Be a teacher or a nurse. I am an R.N. I didn’t want to be a teacher so I took what I thought was the only choice open to me.

What is your dream for your artwork? How has being an artist changed your life?

Being an artist has given me wings and allowed me to fly. How does one quantify ones dreams when you wait most of your life for the dream to be come reality? I am living my dream one step at a time. I will see where the dream takes me. Once a dream is let out of the box it has a life of it’s own.

Where do your ideas come from?

I do not have any set method for deciding on ideas or working titles. Sometimes I will awaken from a dream, other times it might be an article I read, a sculpture I saw, a suggestion from someone or out of our universal consciousness I hear an idea in my head or heart. I maybe painting on one piece and I have to stop because another painting is calling my name.

What materials do you use for your original paintings?

I paint on heavy medium tooth canvas that has been primed with three coats of gesso. The canvas is gallery wrapped. I draw with a watercolor pencil. I paint with Golden Heavy Body Acrylic Paint. I seal the finished painting with two coats of diluted semi-gloss Golden Gel. When finished the painting is then sealed with two coats of Golden MSA varnish mixed with pure mineral spirits for the best UV protection.

Do you use Photoshop in your original paintings?

No. I like to paint the old fashioned way. Brushes, paint and dirty hands. My apron can now stand up on its own!

Did you learn this (how to paint) in art school?

No, these are my own concoctions, world, song, narrative…

Are you an art school graduate?

No. I am am R. N. and have a BA in Political Science and Business.

 

 

Sources of Inspiration

What is your inspiration?

The air I breathe, the water I drink, a passing fancy, a flower opening, a butterfly in flight, a word, a thought, a dream, pain, pleasure, all of the universe as it sings its own song in my ear.

Who influenced you?

That is a good question. I graduated from college when I was in my early 40’s. I had an economic teacher who told me I was so smart that no matter what I did I had an A in his class. On the final exam I transposed the numbers in the test problem. I came up with the right answer for the transposed numbers. Not the right answer for the test as written. He gave me an A. I had never been so unconditionally accepted. I was brought up by parents who lived through the depression. Praise was not something I received. You have so much potential was the war cry. This was the first time, I felt, I was given unconditional support. His influence has stuck with me and slowly changed my life.

 

 

About Ann’s Process

Where do you paint?

In 2010, I rearranged my home and moved my studio from the smallest room to the largest room. I have claimed the family room for my painting studio. It has a twenty foot (+/-) window with north light. I have gallery lighting to work in and display room for the finished pieces. The room is large and has a beautiful rug on the floor. I am surrounded by my paintings and draw energy from my peaceful surroundings.

Do you do work on more than one painting at a time?

I try to finish one painting completely before starting another. The pull to start another piece can get really strong and if I have to give in, I give in.

What is your process?

After I have the title or idea in mind I sketch with a watercolor pencil on a large sketch pad. I have very little patience at this point and spend no more then one or two minutes. A quick sketch on canvas of the figure and then the face takes shape. At this point I will redo the figure or face if it isn’t pleasing to me. Once I accept the sketch the painting begins. I start with the face and placement of the features. The painting then grows around the main character. For more information about my creative process visit ‘the Creative Process’ under the ‘About’ section of my website.

Do you have photos of the process?

I’ll go you one better and post a video or two on YouTube–coming soon. Sign up for my newsletter so I can keep you posted!

How long does it take to complete a painting?

The quick and easy answer is a lifetime. But in reality the first 32 you see here took ten years. They were started over time and never completed. Starting in June of 2009 I painted like crazy and finished them all.

An idea may geminate for minutes, weeks or months. Once I commit to it I do a QUICK sketch. One or two minutes.

I then draw the figure and the face very quickly as a guide. Nothing ever is cut in stone until the painting tells me it is complete. I paint the piece quickly not worrying about paint coverage or perfect lines. I paint starting with the face and body than I add to the design. The design grows from the body without any preconceived ideas on my part. I paint the entire painting at least four times. I become a perfectionist as the work progresses.

If the piece is entirely geometric I do the same thing. I have a starting point somewhere in the middle and the painting grows from there.

Some paintings are busy and some quiet. Each painting tells me when it is done. I work in a zone other than conscious thought. The brush seems to have a life of its own as the design grows. I use a ruler to draw the straight lines but do not use it or tape as a guide to paint. There are no tape or painting guides used in my process other than pencil marks and my eye.

I listen to the fish tank bubbling, the cats doing whatever it is that cats do, and the TV droning away as background noise.

If I work steadily the complete painting is done and sealed in two months.

 

 

Original Paintings and Prints

What is your largest work?

My largest work is called Genesis and is 35 panels. It is 5 feet high and 102 feet long.

I cannot afford one of your large paintings but would like some of your work. What do you offer in a more moderate price range?

Giclées are the best option to bring fine artwork to the public at a reasonable price. Giclees professionally done on the best equipment are the most up to date archival form of reproduction available today. I use only the best equipment and materials to produce artwork that is as good as or even better than the originals. First the original painting is scanned with a state of the art digital scanner. Then the file is reviewed on the computer. Because the scanner can see through multiple layers of paint some corrections need to be made. Ink colors although close to paint colors have to be tweaked to get the best match. Then test strips are run and checked against the original piece for color matching. I print on both canvas and paper. We use an HP Designjet 3200 large format printer. The ink is HP Vivera Ink. The ink is pigment ink. Our CANVAS is 16 ounce and the artwork is gallery wrapped on a 1 1/2 inch deep frame. The artwork is then coated with two coats of a polymer finish. The finish protects the work from everyday particles in the air and UV light. The work’s life on canvas is well over 100 years without any movement in the work according to industry standards. Our PAPER is 300+ grams, imported, heavy weight, acid free, archival watercolor paper. The work’s life on paper is over 240 years without any movement according to industry standards. NOTE: All fine art should not be displayed in strong ultraviolet light. ie: sunlight etc.

What makes your work worth more than a simple print?

The LIMITED EDITION works on CANVAS are hand signed on the front with acrylic paint. The back is hand signed with paint with my full name, the name of the piece, the edition number and the date the edition was done. The LIMITED EDITION works on WATERCOLOR PAPER are hand signed on the front with the number of the edition, the title and my full name and the year.

What supporting material do you supply when I purchase your work?

All LIMITED EDITION works are accompanied by a Certificate of Authenticity on Rosenberg Art Studio watermarked paper and signed by me. A numbered hologram, custom made for Rosenberg Art Studio, is placed on the certificate and the matching number hologram is placed on the back of the piece.

What size Giclées do your paintings come in?

Women of Words, Babylonian Voices and Escape Series are available 40″ x 40″ x 1 1/2″ on canvas. Women of Words, Babylonian Voices, Escape Series and Cats and Other Creatures are available as 24″ x 24″ image on watercolor paper with a 3″ white border all around. Total size 30″ x 30″. Cat and Other Creatures are available 36”x 36” on canvas.

What is your security for on-line purchases?

All purchases are paid through Paypal Virtual Terminal. You do not have to have a Paypal account to make a purchase. We never see your credit information. In our opinion, the Paypal payment system is one of the most secure in the world.

Do you have any pieces I can buy framed?

 

Yes. Our frames are high-end, Neilsen #117 metal molding. The glass is Ultra Violet Conservation Glass. (Please note: if shipped, we use UV Conservation Acrylic on the 31 1/2″x 32″ artwork.) Each piece is custom matted and framed using archival materials. The matte is 4-ply white with a black bevel. When you purchase framed 18 1/2″x18 3/4″ or 31 1/2″ x 32″ hand-signed Giclées, it comes with your choice of frame color (see list below) and is wired and ready to hang. We will help you choose the best color for the piece if you want our input.

Can I have a custom sized print or painting?

As much as I would like to accommodate this request. I am unable to do this at this time unless you order a commissioned piece.

Will you make a custom artwork for me? Do you accept commissions?

There are two options: 1. I am open to suggestions for new paintings. If you are willing to commit to an original painting, and the title speaks to me and you give me artistic freedom….. you have a deal. I would need a non-refundable deposit to be negotiated at the time of order. The preliminary design would be discussed with the end purchaser. You would get the original at current market price and the first four limited edition pieces 40″x40″ canvas giclees included. Shipping charges additional. 2. If I use your suggested title for a painting you will be the first to be offered the original piece and/or the first giclee. (this is offered only to the first person to suggest the title)